Happy Thanksgiving 2014

Category: Episodes

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In 1621, the Pilgrims and Wampanoag people celebrated the first Thanksgiving. Owen and Dean look at how the tribe feels about the holiday today, plus ’70s memories of Charlie Brown’s depressing special, WOR Channel 9′s Thanksgiving Day monster marathons, WKRP’s legendary turkey drop, and the myth of presidential turkey pardons. All this plus Crazy Eddie as a cautionary tale about retailers opening for Thanksgiving, on the Angry History Show…

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The Sounds of Space

Category: Episodes

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NASA just published dozens of audio clips from space, letting us hear galactic events like the lightning storms of Jupiter for the first time. Episode #30 looks back at humanity’s baby steps into the final frontier, from the first Soviet flight and the Eagle landing, to Owen’s uncle piloting the Curiosity rover in the red Martian sands. From JFK to James T. Kirk, this week, on the Angry History Show.

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The Straw Hat Riots of 1922

Category: Episodes

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In the early 20th Century, a gentleman was naked without his hat, and tradition held that he switched from straw hats to felt ones on September 15th. If he wore “the taboo headgear” after that date, hooligans were free to smash it to bits. This was all in good fun until 1922, when some kids from Five Points sparked a bizarre riot that shook New York City from the Battery to the Bronx.

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Goodbye, Robin Williams

Category: Episodes

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Robin Williams entered our consciousness about as alive as a person can be; reflecting his great energy onto us and back into him, it seemed.  Which may be part of why his death pulls so roughly at so many of us.  Angry History mourns his loss and celebrates his awesomeness.  But mostly mourns.  Goodbye, Robin Williams.  We just expected to have you a while longer.

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McSorley’s Old Ale House, 1854

Category: Episodes

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Many listeners have asked to know more about McSorley’s Old Ale House, the inspiration for the conversations that make up our show. So one summer afternoon, we pulled out a chair for you, Dear Listener, and ticked through some of the artifacts in New York City’s oldest bar. It’s a tour from 1854 to the present (unbroken even by Prohibition), this week on the Angry History Show.

More on this topic: Links of Interest

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Alexandria, VA’s 265th Birthday

Category: Episodes

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Alexandria , Virginia , just across the Potomac River from Washington D.C. , has stood at the crossroads of history for three centuries. From the French-Indian War to the American Revolution, the War of 1812 to the Civil War and World Wars, it’s been home to presidents, generals, and even rockers like Jim Morrison and Dave Grohl. Owen reports what he found at the city’s birthday celebration, this week on Angry History.

More on this topic:  Links of Interest

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New York City in the Gilded Age

Category: Episodes

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Author Esther Crain of Ephemeral New York discusses her new book, New York City in the Gilded Age, featuring photos compiled with the New York Historical Society and stories that bring them to life. There’s also a stereoscope for viewing 50 rare 3D images. It’s an era of ragtime, poverty and power — brought to you from the Museum at Eldridge Street, a 126-year-old synagogue in Chinatown — this week on Angry History.

More on this topic:  Links of Interest

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Voices of D-Day

Category: Episodes

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Our Man in Normandy just marked the 70th Anniversary of the Allied landings in France. As a prelude to debriefing him, we listen to the voices that speak to us from those blood-soaked sands, including those of beloved entertainers who did their bit to free Europe. It’s June 6, 1944, and the greatest armada in history hurls itself across the English Channel at Hitler’s Atlantic Wall. This is D-Day.

More on this topic:  Links of Interest

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Hindenburg: “Oh, the Humanity!”

Category: Episodes

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On May 6, 1937, the largest airship that’s ever taken to the air — the German zeppelin LZ-129 Hindenburg — burst into flames on landing at the Lakehurst Naval Air Station in New Jersey, killing 36. What caused the fire that consumed the pride of Adolf Hitler’s air fleet? All that through the eyes of newsman Herb Morrison, whose famous, “Oh, the Humanity!” is etched into the pages of history.

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Tuskegee Airman Col. McGee

Category: Episodes

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Col. Charles McGee holds the record for combat flights by an American pilot, yet he had to fight his own government just to get into the cockpit. By defying the strict segregation of WW2, Col. McGee and the Red Tails proved they had the right stuff. It’s a living legend from the Tuskegee Airmen, this week on the Angry History Show.

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The Angry History Show by Owen Moogan and Dean Karayanis is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.